Pharoah Sanders LWorms 1

"I've already had my mind blown once today," a geezerish head of a certain age tells his friend. "By that woman there." The cause of his expanded horizons, Nubya Garcia, sits smiling in sweet disbelief nearby. A queue for her signature which takes 30 minutes to dissipate is snaking from a record stall which has just been stripped of her latest EP with locust-like ruthlessness. Outside, it's high summer in England, that rare and precious season when blue skies stay unbroken for weeks during June's longest days, retaining the heat and light. In the beautiful Sussex village of Glynde, the weather is a particular gift, which seems to keep on giving whenever Love Supreme is in town. Garcia's rise is part of a youthful resurgence in UK jazz which the festival has supported during its six years, and is now in its own high season. This fresh talent's correspondence with veterans including Pharoah Sanders, Tony Allen and Dave Holland is this year's story.

Nubya Garcia LWorms

The expansion of both Love Supreme and jazz's horizons is shown by Garcia's presence in an Arena tent which has doubled its capacity to 4,000. She looks exhilarated by the scale of an audience whose enthusiasm pushes her band to escalating heights. Her sax solo seems to accompany the Malian desert sounds of Songhoy Blues as they drift in from the Main Stage. When her band's final high-speed storm detonates, Joe Armon-Jones swirls and slides over the keys with deliberately blowsy excess, and Garcia spans her broad tenor range. The decisive moment comes when Armon-Jones meets Femi Koleoso's trip-beats in abstract drum'n'bass-derived shapes more glisteningly beautiful than any of the cold new corporate towers of their London home. Complex yet gut-punch-direct, the crowd greet it as a victory. And a mind is blown.

Over in the Big Top, they are followed by Tony Allen in majestically melodic mood. Long-time observers bemoan a dimming of the 77-year-old's Afro-beat fire. He is still the polyrhythmic heartbeat of tunes from his Art Blakey tribute The Source, whose soul-jazz traverses 20 years of rhythm evolution without breaking sweat, as a mother and daughter sway in a similarly generation-spanning dance. His sextet's muscular brass and lilting guitar operate in mellow balance with the afternoon sun. 

"Fela Kuti is the king of Nigeria," we're told soon afterwards. "I want you all to party like Nigerians!" Allen might agree with the sentiment, but we're back with the London scene, listening to Femi Koleoso, who has returned to the Arena with Armon-Jones and Ezra Collective. They play the high-energy Afro-beat its inventor Allen now largely eschews, with Armon-Jones again flying high.

Ezra Collective LWorms 1

We might expect many things from Pharoah Sanders, as the white-suited, bearded prophet of spiritual jazz makes his curved-backed, shuffle-skanking way to the stage. Roaring "Oi-oi!" like an Essex geezer would be low on the list, but Sanders at 77 is inscrutably impish. Gene Caldarazzo's press-rolls give his band steaming power when in modal unison. The leader blows forcefully, but rarely, one gentle scream sinking down to a softly burnished tone. His potent closing statement to 'The Creator Has A Master Plan' is less memorable than his lushly romantic approach to the ballad 'A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square', showing how far he's travelled from his 1960s provocations with Coltrane.

Sunday morning dawns at Glynde's soulfully open-minded village church with a reading of a fitting Islamic poem, 'Cast All Your Votes for Dancing'. Ian Shaw follows this in the Big Top with his secular prayer for inclusion and change, 'Shine'. Yazz Ahmed then brings ghosts of electric Miles to her meditative, ritualistic, transporting British-Bahraini music. When a bumper Big Top crowd gathers for Dave Holland/Zakir Hussain/Chris Potter, Hussain's percussion is a sort of sequel to Ahmed, as Ezra was to Allen. His tabla dexterity is the jagged flint on which Holland's equally fleet-fingered bass funk bounces and sparks. Their most intense, rocketing exchange, snaked around by Potter's sinuous soprano sax, is triumphant.

Yazz Ahmed LWorms

Steve Winwood's hammering Hammond grooves on a wonderful, Traffic-heavy set show it doesn't really matter what you call rock music which has all jazz's improvisatory virtues, and early 1960s R&B fire. Mavis Staples' radically loving civil rights soul is a tireless blessing, met in sentiment by a simultaneous set by Keyon Harrold. Ending a soulfully introspective solo, the trumpeter from racially schismed Ferguson, Missouri says: "We shall overcome, right? One day."

In its happy accidents and sacred confluences, Love Supreme still lives up to its name.

– Nick Hasted
– Photos by Lisa Wormsley 

Chelsea music venue, Under the Bridge, will play host to several essential dates as part of next month's 10-day Innervisions festival. These include hyperactive Japanese jazz crew Soil & 'Pimp' Sessions who unleash there high-intensity take on post-bop (5 July), followed closely by the revamped US trio The Bad Plus (above right) who appear with newly recruited pianist Orrin Evans alongside original bass and drum dynamos Reid Anderson and Dave King (6 July). And former James Brown trombonist Fred Wesley and his hard-grooving band, The New J.B.'s, also appears (7 July).

There's also a chance to hear hugely acclaimed bassist/singer songwriter Meshell Ndegeocello (top left) perform songs from her sublime new covers album, Ventriloquism, which features spellbinding downtempo takes on songs by Prince, TLC, George Clinton, Janet Jackson and Sade (11 July).

Further Innervisions dates include Incognito (Roundhouse, 7 July); Moonchild/Alpha Mist/Eris Lau (KOKO, 6 July); Lalah Hathaway (KOKO, 8 July); Bugge Wesseltoft/Henrik Schwarz/Dan Burglund (Union Chapel, 5 July); Christian McBride's New Jawn (Union Chapel, 12 July); Janet Key & Carroll Thompson (Under The Bridge, 14 July) and Werkha + Richard Spaven Trio (100 Club, 10 July).

Mike Flynn

For full details visit www.innervisionsfestival.com

hyg2014-07-12lowres17 page image

Connoisseurs of craft ales and well-crafted extemporisation, rejoice!

Another series of South London's premier beer shop blowouts have been scheduled. That's right, BRÅK's monthly improvised music nights run by Cath Roberts, Colin Webster and Tom Ward, continue into the second half of 2018 with a stellar new season of shows taking place at Brockley's booze emporium, waterintobeer. Line-ups are still being finalised, but guests already confirmed include contrabass clarinet specialist Heather Roche, saxophone behemoth Alan Wilkinson, formidable double-bass diablo Dominic Lash (pictured) and live action painter Gina Southgate.

Performances take place on 28 July, 8 September, 3 November and 15 December.

Spencer Grady

For more details visit www.brakbrakbrak.co.uk

The line-up for this year's EFG London Jazz Festival, which runs from 16 to 25 November, is taking shape with some major names and specially curated shows added to the programme. Chief among these is an appearance by revered sax firebrand Archie Shepp who performs his emotive Art Songs and Spirituals show (Barbican, 19 Nov). This features key contributions from Hammond organist Amina Claudine Myers and celebrated US singer Carleen Anderson who leads a choir alongside Shepp's top-notch band including highly-respected drummer Hamid Drake. Another show announced for the Barbican is Anthony Joseph & Friends present 'Windrush: A Celebration' (17 Nov). This sees the poet, novelist and musician lead a multi-faceted tribute to mark the 70th anniversary of the arrival of HMT Empire Windrush in Essex, which arguably kick-started multiculturalism in Britain. The concert is a culmination of a series of events throughout the programme exploring the impact and success of Caribbean culture in the UK, with saxophonist and composer Jason Yarde premiering his 'Windrush Suite', to be performed by a pan-Caribbean ensemble featuring guests including legendary 78-year-old Calypsonian singer-songwriter, Calypso Rose.

There's also a major celebration of the life and music of late great South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela, who died on 23 January this year aged 78, and who had a longstanding relationship with the UK and the London Jazz Festival. Monikered 'The Boy's Doin' It', the concert brings together musicians who Masekela worked with, including vocalist Sibongile Khumalo, great Zimbabwean singer Oliver Mtukudzi, plus Tsepo Tshola and his seminal band Sankomota (Royal Festival Hall, 18 Nov).
Elsewhere, US singer Kandace Springs returns to the capital following her well-received Blue Note album, Soul Eyes, with a concert at the newly opened Queen Elizabeth Hall (17 Nov), while guitar icon Bill Frisell is set to play Cadogan Hall (18 Nov). Acid jazz Hammond hero James Taylor leads his Quartet plus Orchestra for a large-scale take on the movie score Electric Black (Cadogan Hall, 21 Nov) and virtuoso accordionist Richard Galliano explores Astor Piazzolla's 'New Tango' works (Wigmore Hall, 23 Nov). Jazz Cubano is the banner heading for a wide-ranging concert featuring renowned pianist Arturo O'Farrill (son of Chico), and his two sons, trumpeter Adam O'Farrill and drummer Zack O'Farrill; the polyrhythmic fireworks of pianist Omar Sosa and violinist Yilian Cañizares, plus an appearance by inspirational piano prodigy Alfredo Rodriguez (Barbican, 23 Nov).

The Southbank plays host to some contrasting concerts, including Kit Downes playing an unmissable lunchtime organ recital at the RFH (23 Nov); Scandi-Anglo super trio Phronesis lining up on a double-bill with Nordic noiseniks Supersilent (QEH, 23 Nov); rising UK sax star Camilla George and emerging piano talent Sarah Tandy line-up for a double bill (Purcell Room, 23 Nov) and acclaimed soul-jazz singer Sarah Jane Morris celebrates the music of troubled folk-jazz genius John Martyn under the banner Sweet Little Mystery (Purcell Room, 24 Nov).

The second Saturday features the live final of the BBC Young Jazz Musician 2018 with the five finalists each playing a set. Trumpeter Alexandra Ridout, 2016's winner, will perform while the judges make their decision, to be announced at the end of the concert (QEH, 24 Nov). These dates join those already announced in Jazzwise, who are festival media partners, including: Jazz Voice (RFH, 16 Nov); Dave Douglas' UPLIFT (QEH, 16 Nov); Amir ElSaffar's Rivers of Sound (Kings Place, 16 Nov); Tord Gustavsen Trio (Cadogan Hall, 16 Nov); Bobby McFerrin (Barbican, 18 Nov); Lea DeLaria (Bridge Theatre, 18 Nov); Elina Duni/Rob Luft (Clapham Omnibus, 18 Nov); Orphy Robinson's Astral Weeks (QEH, 19 Nov); Youn Sun Nah (QEH, 20 Nov); Stanley Clarke Band, plus Headhunters (RFH, 20 Nov); Leyla McCalla and Melissa Laveaux (Cadogan Hall, 20 Nov); Eddie Parker's Mirrored (Purcell Room, 20 Nov); Darius Brubeck Quartet (Kings Place, 21 Nov); Myra Melford's Snowy Egret (Purcell Room, 23 Nov); Richard Pite's Jazz Repertory Company (Cadogan Hall, 24 Nov); Avishai Cohen/Shai Maestro/Mark Guiliana Trio (Barbican, 24 Nov); Madeleine Peyroux (RFH, 24 Nov) and Monty Alexander (Cadogan Hall, 25 Nov).

Mike Flynn
For more info and tickets visit www.efglondonjazzfestival.org.uk

Wynton Marsalis is more forward-thinking than he gets credit for – some of the sense of the trumpeter's traditionalism regarding jazz, and aspects of his 'controversial' image, are surely overplayed to sell tickets. Although recently there was a backlash against certain comments he made attacking some rap music as "more damaging than a statue of Robert E. Lee". Yet, since he emerged in the early 1980s, Marsalis is a valued keeper of the flame for acoustic jazz. And since 1991 much of his energy has been directed into the running of the massive Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. Thus a rare quartet show at London's Barbican was a chance to get the measure of him at close quarters and to find out how much his vision included a sense of the new and the now.

The quartet's 80-minute set got off to a pleasingly challenging start with the 15-minute suite-like odyssey 'The Magic Hour'. He haunted the higher registers with an avant-tinged noise and cheeky showmanship. The disarmingly interrupted theme of Ornette Coleman's 'Ramblin'', also took a left-field point of departure but soon the group were settling into their comfort zone. Ornette himself was not afraid to be rude or crude or to shock. Marsalis is just too darned tasteful.

'Ramblin'' is a good example of his split loyalties. Long before Coleman theorised his approach as 'harmolodics', what Marsalis explained was "melodic material, in all keys at one time", Ornette was stretching harmony to breaking point. With Wynton you don't feel the same dramatic surge and danger.

WyntonMarsalisQrtBarbican2018 MG 4124-1

He is nonetheless abundantly creative and playful. He obviously enjoys the playing of Daniel Nimmer on piano and especially the prodigal English 25-year Mark Lawandowski on bass, a creative player who did most to consistently shake the tree, ranging from wide riff-bending to melodic études. But was Marsalis enjoying their lively interpolations on the familiar or just the familiar's reassuring lilt?

Marsalis's dedication to the trumpet is beyond dispute. He shares the same versatility born of an obsession with the intricacies of this coil of brass as any avant-gardist working extended techniques. In Roy Eldridge's 'After You've Gone' his use of the mute gave the theme a distant feel of dusty shellac, addressing and defusing the sentimental feel by foregrounding it a stylistic point.

The brilliance and articulation of his tone was beautifully expressed with a sense of intimacy - which was heightened further when he left the stage and promenaded through the spiralling aisles of the auditorium, shaking hands with appreciative audience members thrilled to be this close to the legend. Such a charming evening didn't shake the abiding sense of Marsalis as a bit of a traditionalist. You left with a gourmand's sense of having fared an enjoyable and tasteful repast. If you had to find fault you could quip that it was too faultless. Because it's at the fault lines where the earthquakes happen...

AJ Dehany

Page 3 of 240

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website

If you do not change browser settings, you consent to continue. Learn more

I understand

Breaking News

Szun Waves launch New Hymn To Freedom with live dates

Szun Waves launch New Hymn To Freedom wi…

Electronica jazz trio Szun Waves release their second album, New...

Read More.....
Donny McCaslin’s big Blow set for Scala

Donny McCaslin’s big Blow set for Scala

US saxophonist Donny McCaslin follows the breakthrough success of 2016's...

Read More.....
PRS Foundation Momentum Music Fund now open for applications

PRS Foundation Momentum Music Fund now o…

The PRS Foundation's Momentum Music Fund has helped the likes...

Read More.....
Beats & Pieces Big Band launch Ten with video and tour

Beats & Pieces Big Band launch Ten w…

Manchester's mighty Beats & Pieces Big Band continue their yearlong...

Read More.....
Robert Glasper leads R+R=NOW for stormy Celebrate Brooklyn blow-out

Robert Glasper leads R+R=NOW for stormy …

The history of collectives in jazz are nearly as old...

Read More.....
Are you ready for the Write Stuff? 2018 Applications Now Open

Are you ready for the Write Stuff? 2018 …

Budding music writers listen up! This year's Write Stuff music...

Read More.....
John Coltrane’s The Lost Album: Both Directions at Once hits Top 20 Albums

John Coltrane’s The Lost Album: Both Dir…

Last week's release of John Coltrane's The Lost Album: Both...

Read More.....
Boogie at the Bandstand - Love Supreme's festival within a festival

Boogie at the Bandstand - Love Supreme's…

With an abundance of big names on the larger stages...

Read More.....
Keyon Harrold, Vijay Iyer and EXPO Commissions for 40th Edinburgh Jazz & Blues Fest

Keyon Harrold, Vijay Iyer and EXPO Commi…

The 40th edition of the Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival...

Read More.....
Roy Carr 1945 – 2018

Roy Carr 1945 – 2018

Doyen of the music press for half a century and...

Read More.....
Pharoah's Prophecies Pave Way For New Wave Of Spiritual Sentinels At This Year's Love Supreme

Pharoah's Prophecies Pave Way For New Wa…

"I've already had my mind blown once today," a geezerish...

Read More.....
Meshell Ndegeocello and The Bad Plus for Innervisions Fest at Under The Bridge

Meshell Ndegeocello and The Bad Plus for…

Chelsea music venue, Under the Bridge, will play host to...

Read More.....
Brockley Beer & Improv Sessions Brew Up New Series

Brockley Beer & Improv Sessions Brew…

Connoisseurs of craft ales and well-crafted extemporisation, rejoice! Another series of...

Read More.....
Archie Shepp, Phronesis, Kandace Springs and Kit Downes added to EFG London Jazz Festival

Archie Shepp, Phronesis, Kandace Springs…

The line-up for this year's EFG London Jazz Festival, which...

Read More.....
Wynton Marsalis Quartet open up to the spirit of Ornette at Barbican

Wynton Marsalis Quartet open up to the s…

Wynton Marsalis is more forward-thinking than he gets credit for...

Read More.....
Joe Lovano and Dave Douglas step up with Sound Prints at the Village vanguard

Joe Lovano and Dave Douglas step up with…

Joe Lovano remarked that "it was the end of an...

Read More.....
Jazz Women celebrated at Jazz Centre UK exhibition

Jazz Women celebrated at Jazz Centre UK …

Southend-on-Sea's Jazz Centre UK presents a major exhibition, Jazz Women...

Read More.....
Boggamasta boogie on down at Brussels Jazz Weekend

Boggamasta boogie on down at Brussels Ja…

The UK equivalent to the Brussels Jazz Weekend would be...

Read More.....
Orphy Robinson gets Gibraltar rocking beyond Borders

Orphy Robinson gets Gibraltar rocking be…

British vibes virtuoso Orphy Robinson is artist-in-residence at the year's...

Read More.....
Vijay Iyer Sextet and Julian Lage jive to Jazz Cafe

Vijay Iyer Sextet and Julian Lage jive t…

Having reopened its doors in January 2016, following a multi-million-pound...

Read More.....
Jon Hiseman 1944-2018

Jon Hiseman 1944-2018

One of the UK's foremost drummers and bandleaders, Jon Hiseman...

Read More.....
Airto Moreira's Afro-Samba Anthems Raise Roof At Ronnie's

Airto Moreira's Afro-Samba Anthems Raise…

  No greater sign of changing times comes than in this...

Read More.....
Ayanna Witter-Johnson and Binker & Moses head to Harrogate

Ayanna Witter-Johnson and Binker & M…

The Harrogate International Festival, which has been running for over...

Read More.....
Voting Now Open for 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

Voting Now Open for 2018 Parliamentary J…

Voting is now open for the 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards...

Read More.....
Lost John Coltrane Quartet Album surfaces on Impulse!

Lost John Coltrane Quartet Album surface…

A previously unreleased session by the classic John Coltrane Quartet...

Read More.....
Etienne Charles Triumphant At The Tabernacle With Timely Blend Of Defiance And Celebration

Etienne Charles Triumphant At The Tabern…

  This venue has deep historical resonance for black music in...

Read More.....
Jean Toussaint All-Star 6Tet Shine Bright At Ronnie Scott's

Jean Toussaint All-Star 6Tet Shine Brigh…

  'All-star' is a term mostly out of fashion these days...

Read More.....
Horn Doyenne Holsen Hones Minimalist Drones For Hubro Album Launch

Horn Doyenne Holsen Hones Minimalist Dro…

The Norwegian brass-band tradition, which first evolved in that country...

Read More.....
Vandermark and Nilssen-Love Blow Down Brighton's Green Door

Vandermark and Nilssen-Love Blow Down Br…

  The streets of Brighton have been overflowing with music fans...

Read More.....
Tully Takes The Prize To Ronnie's

Tully Takes The Prize To Ronnie's

  What better way to celebrate the conferring of an honour...

Read More.....
Rebirth Of The Cool: Shabaka Hutchings, Thundercat and Nubya Garcia lead a jazz takeover at Field Day

Rebirth Of The Cool: Shabaka Hutchings, …

  After years of going to jazz gigs and being the...

Read More.....
Anthony Braxton's ZIM Sextet go exploring at Cafe OTO

Anthony Braxton's ZIM Sextet go explorin…

  With the death of Cecil Taylor a few weeks ago...

Read More.....
New British Jazz Generation Blasts Bath With Spiritual Baptism

New British Jazz Generation Blasts Bath …

Bath Festival applied radical surgery to their roster of festivals in...

Read More.....
PYJAEN Prosper At Peckham's Ghost Notes

PYJAEN Prosper At Peckham's Ghost Notes

Catching bands at the beginning of their journeys is so often...

Read More.....
Sons of Kemet, Ashley Henry and Yussef Dayes groove at the Great Escape

Sons of Kemet, Ashley Henry and Yussef D…

Since its beginnings in 2006, Brighton's festival of new music...

Read More.....
Zara McFarlane and Jazzmeia Horn among highlights at St Lucia Jazz Fest

Zara McFarlane and Jazzmeia Horn among h…

In recent times this event has had a tenuous relationship...

Read More.....


Subcribe To Jazzwise

Advertisement

Call 0800 137201 to subscribe or click here to email the subscriptions team

Get in touch

Jazzwise Magazine,
St. Judes Church,
Dulwich Road, 
Herne Hill,
London, SE24 0PD.

0208 677 0012

Latest Tweets

Brighton Alt Fest returns with typically brilliant and eclectic line-up, ft Peter Brötzmann, Irreversible Entanglem… https://t.co/ChKZ97Eb0N
Follow Us - @Jazzwise
@slothracket @ripsawcatfish yeah, we were all getting a little flustered over how the grinding abrasiveness might h… https://t.co/JDa7TYAF5o
Follow Us - @Jazzwise

Newsletter

© 2016 MA Business & Leisure Ltd registered in England and Wales number 02923699 Registered office: Jesses Farm, Snow Hill, Dinton, Salisbury, SP3 5HN . Designed By SE24 MEDIA