Although billed as individuals, this effectively was the Geoff Simkins Trio and this is how their newly-released CD is badged. Reasonably enough, much of their pre-lunch Cadogan Hall programme came from the album and what an eclectic mix it turned out to be. Unsurprisingly, considering altoist Simkins' pedigree and playing stance, two of the pieces were by Lee Konitz but others came from composers as varied as Kenny Wheeler, Nelson Cavaquinho and the late Earl Zindars, this latter worthy known for his association with Bill Evans. There was also 'For DJC', a heartfelt collective tribute to guitarist Dave Cliff, for so long a playing associate for Simkins and now sidelined by illness.

'Make Someone Happy' was the opener, with Nikki Iles quietly chording behind the alto line, Simkins' sound pristine, the phrasing unhurried, the ideas properly formed, ahead of Iles' wonderfully varied solo, harmonically canny, her lines extended, with barrelling tremolos kicking in, as Dave Green took over in his usual industrious way. 'Elsa' by Zindars had a catchy theme, Simkins far from cool, quite impassioned in fact and then it was 'Friendly', the first of the Konitz pieces. This was a swinger whereas 'Old Ballad' by Wheeler was a statelier affair, the alto timbre wistful, the improvisation spacious and considered. Simkins values tonal purity and a slight vibrato, with nothing rough-edged, the dynamic range modest rather raucous, the to-and-fro with his companions clearly pleasing to all three.

'Mooch Too Early' by a New Yorker whose name I failed to catch was a musical palimpsest, imposing Bill Evans chordal shapes on top of Bird's 'Moose The Mooch', the resulting zig-zag line executed at breakneck speed, before 'For DJC' took a gentler turn around the block. 'Screen Jurer' by Zindars allowed Iles to find all sorts of inventive responses, underlining just how unfailingly creative a player she is. This was three-way interplay of the highest order but all, as the late Kenny Everett was wont to say, in the best possible taste. Look out for the album.

– Peter Vacher

 MarcoColonna 3

A ritual accompanies the end of every concert at this enchanting event. Artistic director Corrado Beldi ambles on to the stage with glasses of wine for the artists to propose a toast to both their present endeavours and the future of a festival that places music in the context of Italian culture in the widest possible sense. This essentially means that the art of the improvisation is accompanied by the kind of high-grade gastronomy for which BBC producers and British comedians hooked on long, lazy, sun-dried table talk would surely lick their lips.

Trivialised as the term 'lifestyle' has become, it is what the wily programmers have woven into Novara Jazz. Gigs take place in the squares, gardens and galleries of this florid city west of Milan, and culminate in musicians and audience mingling over the glorious local bounty of cheese, ham and risotto, a dish whose provenance is signposted by the paddy fields that girdle the roads from Novara to neighbouring towns. Lasting the best part of three weeks, the festival has an adventurous line-up that strikes a judicious balance between national and international names, and of all the Italian musicians on the bill the one who becomes a striking presence on the weekend of my attendance is Marco Colonna. The virtuoso multi-reed player impresses in very different settings, the first of which underlines a certain Europhile perspective: a trio with Norwegian drummer-percussionist Thomas Strønen and Italian keyboardist Alessandro Giachero. Founded on an advanced empathy and artistic intelligence that sees the musicians exercise restraint as well as spontaneity this is an engrossing encounter, as the conversation drifts organically from ambient balladry to explosive groove, always framed by novel sounds.

Secondly, Colonna performs solo at the Croce Di Malto brewery and has the audience entirely rapt as it hears his clarinet, bass clarinet and alto saxophone up close and personal. His sound on each is as big and bulbous as the vats, entwining tubes and taps that form the backdrop to the set. As was the case with the trio gig, Colonna proves restlessly inventive in the use of his horns, above all his flights into Rahsaan-style multiphonics by way of simultaneous blowing into the clarinet mouthpiece and bass clarinet, changing his embouchure to evoke the breathy draughts of a shakuhachi flute and manipulating timbre by placing a plastic bottle in the bell of his alto.

Colonna also makes an appearance with saxophonist Dimitri Grechi Espinoza's Dinamitri Jazz Folklore on the main stage of the Broletto courtyard. Drawing liberally on a wide range of African and Italian music, both traditional and modern, the band brings a punchy dance sensibility to bear on its material, but the energy levels are raised considerably as soon as Colonna enters the fray to play a long and scintillating clarinet solo. Espinoza, who leads the octet confidently, is an able improviser and his solo performance at the majestic Basilica of San Gaudenzio, crowning glory of the 19th century architect Alessandro Antonelli, highlights his careful handling of the rich natural reverberations of the edifice that is crowded with ornate sculptures and vivid frescoes. Though he could have refrained from arranging each piece as a call and response between high melody and low bass line, Espinoza excels on a reprise of Monk's 'Round Midnight' in which the theme is re-harmonised and phrased with tantalising new rests on the pulse. Which is something he also did with John Coltrane's 'Naima' in an impromptu rehearsal the previous day.

The final solo performance is that of double-bassist Roberto Bonati and, much like Colonna, he shows great imagination in his desire to push the sonic envelope on his instrument. Bonati thus uses two timpani sticks to hit the body, bridge and strings in a percussive attack that has a strong flavour of African marimba or balaphone, before going on to play fine arco and fretted pieces that display a solid grounding in classical music as well as zestful improvisatory skills, particularly when deconstructing lyrical themes. Less successful is Mirko Pedrotti's middling fusion and Purple Whales' Jimi Hendrix project, which is a frankly underwhelming deployment of young Italian talents such as drummer Stefano Tamborrino as well as the aforementioned Espinoza. They never really get a handle on the iconic source material, in the worst case lowering the all important blues quotient so as to neuter Jimi's vivid storytelling.

Louis-Moholo 1

But a historical meeting of an altogether life enhancing character does take place when Louis Moholo-Moholo and Enrico Rava take to the stage in one of the most highly anticipated events of the festival. They are the surviving members of Steve Lacy's landmark The Forest And The Zoo band, and if 1967 is rightly pinpointed as the year Coltrane died then it is also worth noting that it was the year that quartet was birthing an otherworldly sound down Buenos Aires way.
Fifty years on South African drummer Moholo-Moholo and Italian trumpeter Rava remain capable of creating as much sturm und drang as heat and light when they come together. Moholo-Moholo's minimal kit serves a style built on clarity and finely-judged nuance, whereby his near constant percolation on the snare creates swells of sound, moving blocks that become shaded by the most discreet of rhythmic displacements and cymbal taps that are like whispers to the long controlled holler of the drums. Rava is absolutely imperious, playing only flugelhorn, perhaps to offset the lighter sound of his partner with velvety, bassy purrs as well as wonderfully articulated piercing trills. He has a truly bell like clarity. The constant heartbeat provided by Moholo-Moholo often eases into march time but his knowing skips and swerves funktify any overly military undercurrent, while the cymbal punctuations make an impact precisely because they come so infrequently, following passages where both musicians create a bracing echo chamber for each other's lines.

Moholo-Moholo also joins two pianists, Alexander Hawkins (from his 4 Biokes band) and Giovanni Guidi, along with trombonist Gianluca Petrella in the pulsating Magmatic Quartet, a group that skilfully blends wistful melody and a hard-edged attack which makes the most of the mighty low-end provided by the two baby grands and horn. The drummer is very much the centrifugal force, bubbling away and prompting dynamic responses by way of his own changes of tack, none more so than the moments when he swaps his lighter 'hot rods' for heavier sticks.

Another Italian, trombonist Filippo Vignato also leads an interesting international trio comprising French keyboardist Yannick Lestra and Hungarian drummer Attila Gyarfas. Though the players make a slightly tentative start, feeling their way into the set, once they hit their stride the blend of freewheeling harmony and tight rhythms are enjoyable, especially when a veil of distortion flutters around the keys and brass and Lestra supplements his Rhodes with heavy sub-bass. To a certain extent, the appearance of both Vignato and Rava on the same bill provides a strong symbol of the heritage and legacy of Italian jazz. But the real value of a festival such as Novara is the distinct ambiance of inclusiveness it provides, the sense that the music is part of a larger fabric of socialising that fully engages the whole city.

Concerts and talks, a highlight being Daniela Veronesi's presentation of Lawrence D. 'Butch' Morris' Conduction Workbook, are free, and attendances are high. Novara has put jazz well and truly on the local map, from piazzas to shop windows, where traders are invited to represent the music as imaginatively as possible. Finely-tailored models are graced by trumpets and saxophones as well as zegna and barberis.

– Kevin Le Gendre
– Photos by Emanuele Meschini 

A final flurry of additional performances have been confirmed for this year's fifth edition of Love Supreme Jazz Festival, which runs from 30 June – 2 July in Glynde, East Sussex. Expecting to exceed the 22,000 who attended the greenfield festival in 2016, this year's line-up packs in more opening night action with the Bandstand and Arena firing up early, plus an inaugural festival appearance of Jazz in the Round, the essential monthly Marylebone music showcase hosted by Jazz FM DJs Jez Nelson and Chris Philips. The latter brings together some of the brightest and best of the UK's cutting edge players with the Friday's triple bill including Justin Thurgur Afro Jazztet, Matthew Bourne and Theon Cross (top left), and Saturday late-night live wires Triforce (above right), Randolph Matthews and James Beckwith Trio plus Gearbox Records vinyl session.

The Arena's Friday line-up includes newcomers Jam Experiment, Howes3 and Cara Hammond (above centre), latin-jazz Londoners J-Sonics and Brighton-based Afrobeaters Lakuta. The Bandstand, curated by Eddie Myer of Brighton jazz club The Verdict, shows off a slew of emerging talent across the weekend (listings below), while the Verve Jazz Lounge returns once again offering seated sanctuary for festivalgoers who can watch screenings of documentaries, Gregory Porter – Don't Forget Your Music and Chasing Coltrane, plus a number of Ella Fitzgerald-themed events including Mica Paris talking about her Ella project on Saturday.

The festival, for which Jazzwise is media partner, has now confirmed timings for Main Stage, Big Top and Arena line-ups as follows:

Saturday 1 July – Main Stage: The Jacksons (21.30); Corinne Bailey Rae (19.30); NAO (17.45); D'Influence (16.00); Lee Fields and The Expressions (14.15); LaSharVu (12.30). Big Top: Herbie Hancock (20.30); BADBADNOTGOOD (18.45); Mica Paris sings the Ella Fitzgerald Songbook (17.00); Michael Wollny Trio (15.15); Shabaka and The Ancestors (13.30) and Clare Teal & Mini Big Band (11.45). The Arena: Joey Negro (DJ Set) (23.00); The Comet is Coming (21.45); Becca Stevens (20.00); Sons of Kemet (18.15); Mammal Hands (16.30); Poppy Ajudha (14.45); Ashley Henry Ensemble (13.15) and Maisha (12.00).

Sunday 2 July – Main Stage: Gregory Porter (20.30); George Benson (18.30); Kamasi Washington (16.45); St. Paul and The Broken Bones (15.00); Hot 8 Brass Band (13.30) and La Mambanegra (12.00). Big Top: Robert Glasper Experiment (20.00); Laura Mvula (18.00); Christian Scott (16.15); Charenee Wade (14.30); Michael Janisch Paradigm Shift (13.00) and Kansas Smitty's House Band. The Arena: Brand New Heavies vs Incognito (DJ Set) (22.00); Jordan Rakei (20.45); Yussef Kamaal (19.15); Nubiyan Twist (17.30); Miles Mosley & The West Coast Get Down (15.30); Makaya McCraven (14.00); Blue Lab Beats (12.45) and Camilla George Quartet (11.30).

The Bandstand line-up is as follows – Friday: King Size Slim, Sara Oschlag, The Old Jelly Rollers and Cesca. Saturday: ROB.GREEN, Adrian Kendon Quinet, Zenel, Pocket Dragon and Dave Drake. Sunday: Trees, Sam Barnett, Seven, Mostly McCoy and Mseleku, George Trebar's Nighthawks feat. Matt Wates and Alex Hitchcock Quintet.

– Mike Flynn

For full listings and tickets visit www.lovesupremefestival.com

Bergen-Jazz

Suddenly, a burly Viking saxophonist is softly blowing a ballad in the middle of a Norwegian fjord. The 19th century fishing sloop sailing us between wooded, mist-topped mountains has quietly moored mid-stream. A river journey which had seemed a benign riff on Apocalypse Now is transformed by Trygve Seim (above) standing up near the prow, unannounced and unamplified, backed by a waterfall's distant roar. When he switches from tenor to toy-sized soprano for an Arabic-style tune from his latest ECM album, Rumi Songs, and asks us to hum along, we become a group tuning fork communing with him, on enclosed water which cradles a throbbing acoustic only possible here. It's soulful, Sufi, longboat jazz: unforgettable.

This is the early climax of Nutshell: a showcase event for invited press and pros, alongside the opening weekend of Bergen's public Nattjazz Festival. We're initially based in Hardanger, the small fjord-town home to the Hardanger fiddle, a remarkable 17th century folk-dance instrument with two layers of strings. This allows two melodies to magically harmonise, when played at a similarly old hillside farm by Eirin Tjoflot. It's also played by Nils Økland in the trio 1982 in a beautifully light, pine church, adding wild gypsy flourishes to Øyvind Skarbø's landslide drums, and the bassy pump of Sigbjørn Apeland's harmonium. Their soft folk resolution to a seasick shanty adds to the sense of place, as shadows creep in from the almost endless twilight.

Cellist Maja Bugge (above) is all about locations, sitting amidst snake-coils of rope in Hardanger Boat Preservation Centre as she damps her strings with lime-tree sinew, making them sound keelhauled. Almost equalling Seim's magic when we reach mountain-enclosed Bergen, meanwhile, is pianist Ingrid Breie Nyhus. It's impossible to say quite what her deeply evocative music is, till she explains her transposition of family-learned, troll-peopled folk songs. Then the strong old, roiling forces conjured by 'The Fiddler Hall' are clear. From Edvard Grieg's wooden composing hut by the water on Bergen's edge to Garbarek, roots in folk music and landscape remain crucial.
At a restaurant on Mount Floyen, with Bergen looking Mediterranean below in the spring sun, Team Hegdal's Erik Hegdal leans his head back on tenor to scream, but this band can cry just as well. Diners' conversation quiets for an elegiac coda like a New Orleans funeral, merged with more modern bittersweetness. They move seamlessly from Ornette-style choppy waters to the invitingly lyrical, then a fierce mutant samba, with a mountain forest at their back.

Nattjazz itself takes place inside a former sardine factory. The Helge Lien Trio start with an exotic oceanic pull, Lien's piano pacing like a walk through the jungle, and bringing Blakean tigers to mind. The Thing's drummer Paal Nilssen-Love brings his Large Unit, a high-energy big band informed by his love of free and noise music. There's a sense of steamy dislocation on this hot night during their hyper-speed near-cacophonies, Nilssen-Love's mouth hanging open as he locks in with guitarist Ketil Gutvik at panting, cartoon pace.

elephant9-nattjazz

Elephant9 (above) are the opening night's big draw, with ECM veteran Terje Rypdal guesting, and Ståle Storløkken leaning back from his organ like Star Trek's Scotty when the engines cannae take any more. There's a fair bit of prog-jazz filler between his lightning bolts, though. Storløkken also guests with the free-minded, sometimes hypnotic, sometimes swaggering BmXL, this time humbly comping. The love for the band's Per Jørgensen, a vital Bergen scenester since the 1970s, is clearly felt when this absurdist joker bows his head for a last, piercing trumpet solo. They've been eccentric, but beautiful: Norwegian jazz's rooted originality in a nutshell.

– Nick Hasted

– Photos by Brit Aksnes and Jarle H Moe

Brussels-Jazz2

Real Brussels is nothing like the Brussels of politicised fiction, with its hordes of scheming Eurocrats and pencil pushers dressed in graphite grey – a land of sour milk and precious little honey, where crossing the road means parting a sea of red tape. It isn't glum or buttoned up. It's warm, convivial, bohemian and hip, a happy place to be a musician or a music fan. For a nation of scarcely 11 million, Belgium has always produced an impressive array of jazz talent. We have the Belgians to thank for Django Reinhardt, Toots Thielemans and the saxophone. And, as the inaugural Brussels Jazz Weekend proved, the Belgian scene continues to thrive.

It's an old new festival, which ran for 21 years as the Brussels Jazz Marathon, and the concept remains the same despite the rebrand: three days, over two hundred gigs at venues across the city with a focus on the Belgian scene, and all for free. In fact, it's one of the biggest free jazz festivals in the world. 

This year there were five outdoor stages, flanked by beer tents and street food stalls, on squares across town. Place Sainte-Catherine, at the centre of a scruffy, hip neighbourhood that feels a little like London's Soho, was the place to go for funk and ska-fueled party bands, including Saturday's headliners, a six-piece called Opmoc, who took the stage to the sound of blaring sirens and had the young, intoxicated crowd jumping up and down 30 seconds into the first number. Place du Grand Sablon, in front of the exquisite, 15th century Brabantine Gothic Église Notre-Dame du Sablon, and Place Fernand Cocq Plein, a leafy square 30 minutes walk from the centre, were more genteel. While Place du Luxembourg, by the European Parliament, was half way between the two – and ultra-relaxed when I pitched up on Friday evening, with children playing and couples lounging on the grass, enjoying a soundtrack of balmy jazz-pop.

The strongest sets took place on the absurdly handsome Grand Place, where the main stage was set up, overlooked by a magnificent 15th century town hall and the headquarters of the city's guilds, decorated with architectural flourishes and extravagant quantities of gold leaf. Promising bassist Theo Zipper and his quartet, winners of last year's XL-Jazz Contest (the festival's showcase for new talent) kicked things off, with music from forthcoming album Gorilla. It paired choppy, modal grooves with mellow hooks and explored some dark harmonic corners, calling to mind the writing of Tomasz Stańko. Impressive trumpeter Aristide d'Agostino, who took the lion's share of the solos, had a little of the Polish great about him too. 

Tenor-player Nicolas Kummert's quartet, featuring sought-after Beninese vocalist/guitarist Lionel Loueke, provided a laid-back counterpoint. There's was a soft-focused set, drawn from new album la diversité, that brought ticking grooves, thrumming acoustic bass figures and wiry melodies, borne by the trade winds from West Africa. A haunting rendition of 'Gnossienne' by French avant-gardist Erik Satie varied the soundworld a little and was warmly received by the crowd filling the cafe tables on the square. My only gripe was with the hesitant, falsetto refrains Kummert sang on Cohen's 'Hallelujah' and elsewhere, which detracted from the set. He's an excellent tenor player: lyrical, with a rich sound similar to Tim Garland. Better to leave the singing to the honey-voiced Loueke, who sounded sublime on his own 'Veuve Malienne', weaving a percussive introduction from breaths, tongue clicks and filigree guitar. It was a masterclass in subtlety and the use of space.

There's a rich vein of jazz-alt rock fusion in the current Belgian scene. Kneebody was my reference point during a grungy set from Brandhaard, a quartet fronted by tenorist Steven Delannoye and outstanding young trumpeter Jean-Paul Estiévenart, who seemed to be playing in every second band. They were a little rough around the edges, but they more than made up for it with some bruising, overdriven originals, studded with bold hooks, stabs and skronking, anarchic solos. 'Small World' had a bluesy, country music feel about it, opening with bleary textures and drunken sustain-heavy smears played by guitarist Reiner Baas. It was the kind of thing you'd expect to hear if you woke up with a brutal hangover and a fist full of glass on the floor of a saloon bar in the midwest. Baas' own 'The Dance of Princess Discombobulatrix' was another highlight, bringing scribbled horn lines and a blazing, Gerard Presencer-esque solo from Estiévenart. Pianist Igor Gehenot's four-piece, Delta, featuring virtuosic French fluglehornist Alex Tassel, were mellower and a little more ECM, but with similar rock leanings. They played several pensive ballads, including Tassels' 'Johanna', and a beautifully tender arrangement of 'My Funny Valentine', then picked up the pace with flexing flugle lines, slamming piano chords and rhythmic leaps from rock to driving swing, on 'Starter Pack' and 'Step 2'.

Most impressive of all were flawless Russian trio LRK (one of a sprinkling of overseas guests), with Evgeny Lebedev on piano, Anton Revnyuk on bass and Ignat Kravtsov at the drums. They added a few Russian folk tunes to the contemporary jazz-rock blend and had the crowd on their feet, with non-stop fireworks, jaw-dropping virtuosity and riveting interplay. 'Nebylitsa', named after an out-of-control Russian fairytale, opened with a dizzying, cross-handed piano intro from Lebedev who kickstarted an algorithmic, math-rock groove. There were growling bass pedals, muscular wallops, folky asides and moments of pulsing ambience. 'No Tears' was an emotive ballad with a sweeping dynamic range and 'Plyasovaya', based on a traditional Russian dancing song, was sparkling, with Kravtsov and Revnyuk at full tilt leading fiendish switches of meter before a closing piano accordion feature for Lebedev. All three men have played with some big names (Lebedev's CV includes Jack DeJohnette, Marcus Miller and Terri Lyne Carrington), but they're relatively unknown as a trio. April's If You Have A Dream is their second release. Watch out.

As the sinking sun caught the tops of the buildings and made the gilding glow, I went exploring. Brussels has some excellent jazz clubs and they were all hosting free gigs as part of the festival. The bars around Place Saint-Géry were buzzing by 9pm, with music and punters spilling out into the street. An impromptu kick-around was taking place in the middle of Boulevard Anspach. It felt like you could go anywhere and have a good night.

I ended up in nearby Café Floréo: a boiling, airless room with some vaguely African art on the walls, sat at a table by the window, necking cold Maes Pils as bassist Everton Firmeza (Brazilian, but based in Brussels since 2015) and his multi-national trio stormed through some funked-up latin originals, with a few Hermeto Pascoal numbers thrown in. Firmeza's was one of the few gigs on the programme labelled avant-garde. It wasn't the free improv set I was hoping for, but the group were compelling to watch all the same: thrillingly reactive, totally in sync, switching between feels mid-song and mid-chorus. Firmeza and Italian keys player Piergiorgio Pirro teamed up on the melodies and Beninese drummer Christi Joza Orisha dropped halftime R&B, bossa nova, and rumba feels, stitching needle-sharp patterns on the rim of his snare with his shell-adorned dreads dancing about his shoulders. Towards the end of the set, they invited excellent flautist Sylvain Boisvert to join them and he added breathy multiphonics and snatches of fluttering counterpoint.

The following night, I squeezed into the jam packed Music Village, a characterful club done out in vermillion and gold, just behind the town hall. It's only been open since 2000 but it already feels like an institution. There I caught a set of sunshiney salsa and son from Rey Cabrera, a singer from Santiago de Cuba who moved to Brussels in 2003. Backed by his top flight septet, the Amigos, he span yarns about campesino life in a voice as rich as coffee, his tres dancing amid the hip-swinging grooves.

My last stop, and my favourite, was L'Archiduc, an art deco gem in a building that dates back to the 1930s, where pianist Jeremy Dumont and his trio of bassist Daniele Cappucci and drummer Fabio Zamagni were swinging hard enough to blow the coloured glass out of the windows, burning through 'Dolphin Dance' and Monk's 'Rhythm a Ning' amid whistles and cheers. It's a dream venue for small band jazz, a misshapen rotunda, no more than 10 metres across, painted a cheery, paddling pool blue. For Dumont's set there was a baby grand wedged between the two chrome-sheathed pillars in the centre of the room. You sit around the edges or lean over the railing of a small balcony, tucked just below the ceiling, and watch from above. Either that or you pick a spot by the bar, where I was, all but perched on Zamagni's shoulder, so close to the action I could feel the draft from the ride cymbal and see the sweat running down Cappucci's face as he dug in for one more sinew-stretching chorus.

Of the ones that got away, I was sorry to miss Belgian guitar great Philip Catherine, who was playing Sounds Jazz Club, as well as exciting young drummer Antoine Pierre. Pierre's Urbex, which came out last year, is exquisite – an album of engrossing, orchestral sound collages scored for octet. It's what you'd get if you paired Maria Schneider with Leafcutter John and Bad Bad Not Good – restlessly creative, thought-provoking and free. A lot like real world Brussels.

– Thomas Rees

 

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Saxophonist Tommy Smith launches his new quartet at the upcoming...

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Herbie Hancock, The Thing and Pine/Omar for EFG London Jazz Festival

Herbie Hancock, The Thing and Pine/Omar …

Iconic jazz keyboardist Herbie Hancock and rowdy Scandinavian trio The...

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New beat-jazz generation gets biggest Love Supreme Jazz Festival moving

New beat-jazz generation gets biggest Lo…

"Clearly, this festival is all about love," Gregory Porter says...

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Geri Allen – 12/06/57 - 26/06/2017

Geri Allen – 12/06/57 - 26/06/2017

The news that Geri Allen has died from cancer at...

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Herbie Hancock to play two nights at EFG London Jazz Festival 2017

Herbie Hancock to play two nights at EFG…

Iconic jazz keyboardist Herbie Hancock has just been confirmed for...

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Grooving in Glynde – Ciro Romano talks about five years of Love Supreme Jazz Festival

Grooving in Glynde – Ciro Romano talks a…

The Love Supreme jazz festival enters its fifth year as...

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Oli Rockberger video exclusive ahead of album and live dates

Oli Rockberger video exclusive ahead of …

British soul-jazz singer/pianist Oli Rockberger is set to release his...

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Brigitte Beraha and John Turville create live jazz score for The Umbrellas of Cherbourg screening

Brigitte Beraha and John Turville create…

An unmissable special screening of the 1964 French New Wave...

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