The organisers of the Love Supreme Jazz Festival, which runs from 5 to 7 July 2019, have confirmed that iconic jazz pianist Chick Corea will be performing at next year’s festival. The Return to Forever keyboard maestro, who’ll be 78 next June, will be bringing his fiery Spanish Heart band with him, the ensemble featuring stunning jazz flautist Jorge Pardo and guitarist Niño Josele (both former Paco De Lucia bandmembers), as well as trumpeter Michael Rodriguez, trombonist Steve Davis, bassist Carlitos Del Puerto, drummer Marcus Gilmore and flamenco dancer Nino de los Reyes for what promises to be a festival highlight. Also announced is hot London keyboardist Kamaal Williams who will be performing his danceable drum’n’bass-inspired funky fusion from his recent album The Return.

The third headline name confirmed is best-selling jazz-folk singer Madeleine Peyroux, who’ll be preforming songs from her 2018 album, Anthem. These names join those already announced by Jazzwise, which include multi-Grammy Award winning jazz-funk crew Snarky Puppy, high-energy UK jazz star Jamie Cullum, and celebrated soul diva Gladys Knight. Taking place once more in the idyllic countryside setting of Glynde in the South Downs in East Sussex, the festival looks set to build on its biggest year to date in 2018, which saw 45,000 people in attendance across the weekend. Jazzwise is media partner for the festival.

Mike Flynn

Early bird tickets are available for a limited time from www.lovesupremefestival.com/tickets

The press obituaries for Peter Boizot, who has died aged 89 after a lengthy illness, have largely concentrated on his role as founder of the Pizza Express restaurant chain. He had enjoyed pizza while working in Europe and brought the first specialist oven to the UK, opened his initial Pizza Express outlet in Wardour Street in 1965 and the rest is history, as they say.

More pertinently for Jazzwise readers he began to feature jazz performances in the basement of his Dean Street restaurant in Soho. Initially, these involved pianists like the late Lennie Felix, but gradually under the auspices of successive bookers Dave Bennett and KC Sulkin, Dean Street became a seven-nights-a-week haven for every visiting American musician and a whole school of mainstreamers like Warren Vache, Ruby Braff and, particularly, tenorist Scott Hamilton, who continues to appear there often. Peter later took on Kettner’s, a venerable Soho landmark and employed a series of pianists, Jazzwise’s own Brian Priestley included, to play there for the lunch-time diners. Gradually other Pizza Express outlets also began to offer jazz, including the Maidstone restaurant and Pizza on the Park, eventually London’s principal cabaret venue until it was sold off and converted into a boutique hotel.

Boizot, who had already started an employee’s newsletter, later initiated Jazz Express, a monthly magazine which employed writers like Peter Clayton and Max Jones (as well as me) and covered the wider jazz scene. There were also occasional releases on his Pizza record label and he supported two resident bands, the Kettner’s Modern Jazz Sextet, which gave musicians like Alan Barnes and Gerard Presencer early prominence, and the more mainstream Pizza Express All Stars, led successively by Dave Shepherd and Tommy Whittle. He also sponsored the Soho Jazz Festival and underwrote the all-star Pizza Express Jazz Festivals.

Very much a man of eclectic tastes and interests other than jazz, Boizot held contributor’s lunches at Kettner’s where one might rub shoulders with the likes of Spike Milligan or the artist Eduardo Paolozzi whose work he collected. A keen hockey player into his early sixties, Peter liked to host his hockey friends and his Liberal Party associates at Dean Street. He had twice stood unsuccessfully as a Liberal candidate.

He became substantially wealthy when the Pizza Express chain went public in 1993 and later returned to his home town of Peterborough, investing heavily in the town’s cultural and sporting life. Boizot owned Peterborough FC for 10 years, bought the town’s Great Northern Hotel which hosted Peterborough Jazz Club and ploughed extensive funds into a new cultural centre.

Boizot later sold the hotel and returned only occasionally to his old Soho haunts. He had been one of London’s primary jazz impresarios and we, musicians and punters alike, owe him a great deal. Peter was mercurial, generous, impulsive, always dynamic and sometimes exasperating, but a wonderful companion and ambassador for jazz.

Peter Vacher

 

Ahead of starting the Vortex in 1988, there is nothing in the early life of David Mossman, who died on Saturday at the age of 76, that would naturally make us think that he was ‘destined’ to run a jazz club in a relatively unrecognised part of London. Here was an East End-born black cab driver with a love of mountaineering, a grandfather at the age of 34, with a love of the music of Neil Diamond. His only experience of jazz previously had been going to see some gigs in the 1950s. But he was a man with a sense of flair and intuition, who could take calculated risks in terms of what he did, which musicians played at the club and how it looked. He knew how to survive, and take so many of us with him.

In so many ways, he had a lot in common with another person who was as influential in his own way on the London scene: John Jack. Both of them were ‘improvisers’ – not in terms of the pure jazz sense, but in terms of working out how to get the music heard. Meanwhile, on the other side of London, Steve Rubie has been doing the same at the 606 for 40 years. (In fact, David sought out Steve’s advice when the club first opened.)

Most vital of all, once the club had started, he had to find musicians whom he could trust to put together the groups and perform the music. He worked it out through listening carefully and working out who had the right feel. He wasn’t hoodwinked by groups with great marketing nous, nor by pure technical wizardry. But it seemed to work, as he gave slots to many who have gone on to greater things. I have spoken to so many musicians grateful for getting first opportunities. This has also come up in many of the contributions on social media over the past day since he died. Some of those who got major early ‘breaks’ at the Vortex include Partisans, Ingrid Laubrock, Tom Arthurs and Christine Tobin. He somehow managed to squeeze in extra large Kenny Wheeler Big Bands and I am surprised that the floor, precarious at the best of times, survived the numbers who turned up to a benefit gig for Steve Buckley with Delightful Precipice.

Once he trusted musicians, then he would give a pretty free hand in what they did, and he had them back regularly and through these he found more connections. Jazz Umbrella, Blow The Fuse, The London Jazz Orchestra, the Vortex Jazz Quartet led by Huw Warren and John Parricelli. The list is endless. And not to forget the themed seasons by Billy Jenkins.

But it also extended to giving at weekends a more ‘commercial’ stability with Ian Shaw, Stan Tracey and more, and the improv scene around Elton Dean, Derek Bailey and Evan Parker. I am grateful that he helped me in my own first experiences of live music promotion, having been mainly just a record label founder till then.

The musicians repaid his faith, and helped out to create a club that felt like what a club should be, as a place for musicians, fans and people wanting a great night out. He wasn’t a form filler, and so it never became a place reliant on an Arts Council life support system. He was generous to his friends, which is really how he regarded the musicians, but also he was concerned that the public got nights to remember. Through that commitment, generosity and passion, he likewise found the audience and similarly changed many of their lives (my own being no exception).

The Vortex had built up a position of being a loved community hub. So it was a group of fans and musicians that dissuaded him from moving to Ocean in Hackney, a short-lived over-funded arts centre disaster, and started looking first to buy the existing building (now a Nando’s if you are looking along Stoke Newington Church Street) and then find the present place in Dalston to where the club moved in 2005.

The aim was to keep as much of that imaginative, social and creative side to the club but take some of the weight off David’s shoulders. He was in the process of moving to Margate with his partner Lesley, well before the town became ‘Hackney-on-Sea’. And soon his new cafe there was putting on jazz gigs and he started the Margate Jazz Festival.

Nevertheless he still came up regularly at weekends to the Vortex to help out, to sort out the seating, to check that we were behaving right and introduce the bands at “London’s listening jazz venue”. And this went on even when his cancer, which was first diagnosed 15 years ago, was worsening. The Vortex to him was as powerful as any drug that was keeping him going and he had a real survivor’s instinct even in this.

We are proud that we have continued to keep much of what made the Vortex under David’s stewardship. David created what a jazz club should be – a living room owned by everyone. A place where musicians can be creative and interact with audiences. It has changed to being more of a social enterprise mainly run by volunteers. Of course it has needed to continually adapt to survive. The legacy is there in terms of the support given to so many. And together let us ensure that this is not forgotten. The Vortex is more than just a brand name. I myself am proud to have got to know David and have been regarded as a friend as well as a business associate.

David has given his body to science, in gratitude to all that the specialists at UCL did for him over the years. I am sure that there will be a problem finding a new home for his heart which was so big that there is no space large enough for it.

Oliver Weindling

Photo by Mark Hewins – www.flickr.com/photos/mark_hewins/

 Greg Fox

The second phase of Poland’s Jazz Jantar festival involved five nights of mostly twinned bills. The northern port city of Gdańsk was washed over with some of the most vital young acts from the UK and the US, its three programmers having a particular feel for what’s rising to the surface in this bubbling pot of modernity.

The Thing With Five Eyes might sound like some heavy-ass doomcore combo, but instead, they are a trio dedicated to spacious ambiance, adopting a ritual presence, complete with massive gong, laptop and prominent oud soloing. A fourth member, Mohammed Antar, was booked to play flute, but ultimately wasn’t able to make it to Gdańsk. Emanating from the Netherlands, TTWFE are a pan-European grouping, from Dutch, French and Russian quarters. Jean Christophe Bournine’s bowed bass imparted an immediate Arabic aura, rapping the body of his instrument, as if it’s a darbouka. Leader Jason Kohnen initially stroked his gong, then deployed mallets to intensify its rumble, turning to electro-pads while a growing symphonic swell emerged from his laptop. The Russian Dmitry Globa-Mikhailenko’s oud was played comparatively straight, as bass sounds quaked out of the computer. The following stretch retired the electronics, allowing a sensitive relationship between oud and bass, with Kohnen turning back to his gong subtleties. Soft electronic womb pulses eventually returned, so low that they represented internal ribcage business. The oud became coated in harmonic effects, to the extent that it no longer sounded like an oud. The overall sonic experience was Arabic-styled meditation, but heavily filtered into the abstract zone via electronic processing.

Pulverize The Sound have changed. This NYC trio have now decided to operate in a wildly improvised mode, even if they are allowed to drop in sudden modules from already existing compositions. No set-list guarantees high flying. Peter Evans often picked pocket trumpet, Tim Dahl favoured fuzz bass and Mike Pride brought along a side-display of thunder-bass drum, two heavy gongs, and tiny chimes. Evans rammed his tiny bell onto the microphone, hooded for amplified internal tubular distress. Pride clacked blocks like a 1930s dance-band percussionist. Dahl’s bass sound became an oscillating slipstream tone, shorn of audible fingering sounds. Then he wrenched out jetstream extensions, Pride switching to brittle bongo rattles. Dahl vocalised, melding inseparably with the bass storm, and Evans gruffly groaned through his horn too, each phase of the fairly concise set imploding or exploding in turn, crushed tightly with manic hyper-speed rifflets. This was one of the peak festival sets, taking jazz improvisation to its almost ridiculous limits. We were exhausted, but still just about sane, when a suitably brief encore featured Pride on bongos and Evans on pocket trumpet again, taking it down a touch for the finish.

Drummer Greg Fox (pictured above) is still arguably best known for his initial work with the controversial black metal outfit Liturgy, but he has since gone on to operate in multiple prolific settings, including Zs and Ex Eye. Quadrinity finds him joined by Justin Frye (bass), Michael Beharie (guitar) and Maria Grand (tenor saxophone). Fox pummelled beside Beharie’s 12 acoustic strings, with extra electronic cycles controlled by the leader, who remained the most powerful presence throughout, absolutely at the centre of his own music. Quadrinity possessed a magnetic co-existence between slow eruption and a strangely introverted power, sustained at length, solos passing thoughtfully between each member, in the midst of a rolling process.

There was just one set on the final night, with James Holden & The Animal Spirits being much jazzier than expected. The leader sat on a high platform, in the manner of an Indian classical musician, his modular synthesiser wires knotted around an ecstasy of spiritual electro-pulsation. The stage was profusely decorated with plastic plant life (or possibly even the real greenery). Holden was always central, but crucially aided by percussion and horns, the latter section featuring Polish guest reedsman Wacław Zimpel, who provided several outstanding solos. There were bells, intoned vocals, then free bursts of alto saxophone over the sequenced pulsing, a multiple tone plateau planting a Terry Riley sense memory deep within our bowels. The final run was staggering, with older works ‘Renata’ and ‘The Caterpillar’s Intervention’, stomping and shaking over a big tom boom, coated with a pseudo-sitar shimmer. This was a typical example of Jantar viewing a jazz core, prone to spreading out into further universes. Holden beamed with sheer joy.

Martin Longley
– Photo by Paweł Wyszomirski        

 Irresversible Ent

Jazz Jantar has been running in the northern Polish port of Gdańsk for the last two decades, and is housed in Klub Zak, an arts centre that has roots stretching back 60 years. ‘Jantar’ refers to amber, for which this coast is renowned. The main part of the festival spans 11 days, with two sets each evening. This year, there was a notably strong line in UK and US acts, though with fewer indigenous Polish artists included than in 2017.

Irreversible Entanglements had appeared a week earlier at Jazzfest Berlin, but this Gdańsk set was superior, generating a crackling energy in this more intimate setting. Hardcore free-jazz simultaneity took over the muted trumpet and chattering alto saxophone of Aquiles Navarro and Keir Neuringer, while Camae Ayewa was dancing more than usual, visibly preparing for her first verbal release. As bass and drums coalesced (Luke Stewart/Tcheser Holmes), Neuringer brought out his percussion collection of shakers and bells, while Navarro turned his horn into a low-note echo wind tunnel. When Ayewa began to intone, the bustle turned to sparseness. When a swarming climax arrived, the players were making a formidable free racket, with such peaks frequently cutting to just bass and drums, before a new patch of verbal and instrumental intensity grew anew.

On some nights, the pairing of bands offered similarly inclined artists, but on others, the matching could be completely contrasting. Both strategies were usually successful, for different reasons. Following the Entanglements, trumpeter Josef Leimberg (pictured above) and his Astral Progression Ensemble altered the orientation to Los Angeles spiritual funk-jazz, cutting off the spikes and breathing out the mist. Spacey, with flute and Rhodes, tarry low strings, alto saxophone and bass clarinet solos, a retro cosmic approach was refracted through a modern Californian prism, a very sparse mystical meandering section being surprisingly successful. The reed specialist Tracy Wannomae was a real revelation, contributing multiple monstrous-release solos, pleading up into the rafters, followed by Leimberg himself drawing out emotive smears. The leader rationed his actual trumpet parts, and appeared to be equally interested in percussion embellishments.

M Halvorson

The double-bill of alto saxophonist Chris Pitsiokos and guitarist Mary Halvorson (pictured above) held closer ties, representing the hyperactive, idea-loaded NYC scene. CP Unit boasted a compact assault from alto, guitar, bass and drums, somewhat softened since their Moers Festival performance last May. Pitsiokos is a deep Zorn disciple, but the emphasis has lurched from porcupine riff-twitching to sinuous James Blood Ulmer roaming, the tunes stretched out more, as a stealthier alto ribboning suggested that Pitsiokos is now looking past Zorn to Ornette, or maybe even James Chance and John Lurie. There’s now more space, and more nervy no wave funk. There was also a compulsive alto solo that appeared to recreate North African reed flute multiplicity via a footpedal.

The Mary Halvorson Octet continued to refine their new Away With You material, following a Jazzfest Berlin gig, with the leader immersed in the chiming co-existence of her slide playing with that of Susan Alcorn’s pedal-steel guitar. Tomas Fujiwara gave a stadium-sized drum solo, but ended up slashing cymbals, limiting the hiss with his fingers straight afterwards. Then trombonist Jacob Garchik drastically curtailed his phrases for a stutter attack. A few even newer numbers came at the end, one called ‘Fortune Teller’ (not the 1962 Benny Spellman soul classic, penned by Allen Toussaint), with Alcorn using a wine glass, Halvorson weebling in sympathy, setting up a dampened treble figure that was soon echoed by the horns of Garchik, Jon Irabagon, Ingrid Laubrock and Dave Ballou. Free chatter became a slugging groove, then it was the turn of tenor and trombone, inhabiting a creepily sparse terrain. The encore was another new piece, ‘Rolling Heads’, based around Halvorson’s looping, with this further-along-the-tour set cementing an increased strength, confidence and, therefore, looseness, to the repertoire.

An illustration of Jantar’s various commitments is the presence, two nights later, of the Aaron Diehl Trio, bringing mainline NYC jazz club fare to provide a sharp contrast. Diehl is a slick pianist, but he’s a master of gaining dynamic interest through hopping from smooth flow to open breakdowns, particularly those spotlighting his extroverted drummer Gregory Hutchinson. Diehl made selections from Dick Hyman’s études, dedicated to piano greats from down the decades (Tatum, Brubeck, Evans), as well as interpreting the Philip Glass études that he’s been performing for their composer in recent years. When Hutchinson and bassist Paul Sikivie joined in, the Glass splintered into the jazz universe, expanded and explored. This set was a masterclass in how to keep mainline jazz consistently on the move, arresting our attention with wily moves and individualist solos.

Martin Longley
– Photos by PawełWyszomirski (Astral Progression Ensemble); Jan Rusek (Mary Halvorson)

 

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